Cosmetic surgery – abnormally normal part of our life now!

Welcome to the artificial world!

Via theguardian.com Nobody is surprised that the number of people having cosmetic surgery continues to rise. No eyebrows have been raised. Nor are people surprised that 90% of the 50,122 people treated (that feels like the wrong word, never mind) in Britain last year were women. Nobody is surprised to note this creeping acceptance of surgery, of a rise in eyelid operations, earlobe lifts, people cutting out photos of celebrities to show the doctor, and asking for a more “Winslettey” chin.

The rise in demand for surgery is surely at least partly a response to the way it is advertised. The seasonal promotions, the advertisements carefully targeted to fuel and exploit people’s poor body image, ads (like Harley Medical’s tweet suggesting a “#boobjob” as an “original Christmas present”) that normalise and trivialise unnecessary surgery, with grinning bikini models and their white white smiles.

Surprising yet true. In a “beauty is in the looks” obsessed society, it is but obvious that cosmetic surgery would become as normal as treating cough and cold.This will only increase in the future unless there are laws to curb its rise. Something sensitive enough to make people stay away from the perils of a botched up surgery where it was not necessary in the first place. This is very well captured by the article in huffintonpost which says the following:

via huffingtonpost.com We have been living in a youth- and beauty-obsessed culture for a long time now, so long that we barely blink at the constant barrage of air brushed and photo-shopped images that reinforce it. The yearning for an ideal image is presented as an imperative. The pressure is incessant. While men feel some of it — accounting for about a million cosmetic procedures this year — it compares to 10.3 million performed on women, who feel it more. In short, there is no escaping its influence.

Cosmetic surgery is slowly turning out to be a necessity without clear explanation of the damage it can do to the natural body. Everyone is caught up in the frenzy to look beautiful with a perfect body and the immediate solution seems to be going under the knife. Sad but true – this is certainly not what we would like to pass on to the next generation, correct?